admin

Biodiesel

Biodiesel

Biodiesel is a domestically produced, renewable fuel that can be manufactured from vegetable oils, animal fats, or recycled restaurant grease for use in diesel vehicles. Biodiesel’s physical properties are similar to those of petroleum diesel, but it is a cleaner-burning alternative

Read More

FEEDSTOCK

FEEDSTOCK

MULTI FEEDSTOCK PROCESSING PLANT: The Competitive Edge which our valued clients are assured of is the simple fact that our processing plants are so designed that they can process a number of easily available raw feedstock (In the Indian Sub-Continent) in to Biodiesel meeting all Global Standards and crossing all the levels of feedstock constraints and rigidity. Hence the equilibrium between the demands for feedstock in order to produce Biodiesel in tune with the plant capacity (viz. 5 MTPD, 10 MTPD, 20 MTPD….300 MTPD) is economically met and it provides an excellent payback period and therefore a short gestation period for the capital expenditure for our valued clients. Following are the list of feedstock’s that can be used for the production of biodiesel: Jatropha Curcas Pongamia Pinnata Madhucha Rice bran oil Neem oil Rubber seed oil Sal seed oil Palm oil Cottonseed oil Rape seed oil Sunflower oil Soyabean oil Castor oil Used Vegetable oil Fish oil Animal fats/Tallows...

Read More

BENEFITS OF BIODIESEL

BENEFITS OF BIODIESEL

QUALITY ASSURANCE DEPARTMENT BIO DIESEL Biodiesel is renewable fuels; it can be used without changes in existing engine. Biodiesel reduces the exhaust emission thus helps in reducing pollution.Biodiesel increases rural income; provide employment and leads towards economic growth of India. BENEFITS OF BIODIESEL Biodiesel reduces 100% CO2 emission. Biodiesel reduces smoke due to soot free and complete combustion. Biodiesel reduces hydrocarbon emission. Biodiesel reduces carbon monoxide emission. Biodiesel is safe for transport due to high flash point. Biodiesel is safe for handle as it is bio-degradable and non-toxic. Biodiesel is renewable energy sources. Biodiesel promotes rural development. The comparative study report for the HSD, Biodiesel (PME) and Furnace Oil Sr.No. Parameter HSD Petro Diesel PME Biodiesel 01 Cetane No 45 58 – 62 02 Carbon Residue % mass 0.35 <0.05 03 Flash Point 0C 60 60 >145 04 Sulphur Content% mass 0.25 <0.0002 05 Viscosity@400C cSt 1.8 – 5.0 4.5 – 4.8 06 Calorific Value Kcal/kg 10700 9600 07 Density@150C kg/m3 883.0 874.0 08 Boiling Point 0C 215 – 376 >290 09 Melting Point 0C N.A. 12 10 Pour Point 6 – 18 16 Remarks: Biodiesel reduces exhaust emissions compared to Petro Diesel. Biodiesel is renewable fuel and 100% Biodegradable, Fossil fuels and its Derivatives are not biodegradable. Petro Diesel existing engines can utilize the Biodiesel. BIODIESEL EMISSIONS Biodiesel is the first and only alternative fuel to have a complete evaluation of emission results and potential health effects submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the Clean Air Act Section 211(b). These programs include the most stringent emissions testing protocols ever required by EPA for certification of fuels or fuel additives. The data gathered complete the most thorough inventory of the environmental and human health effects attributes that current technology will allow. EPA has surveyed the large body of biodiesel emissions studies and averaged the Health Effects testing results with other major studies. The results are seen in the table below. To view EPA’s report titled “A Comprehensive Analysis of Biodiesel Impacts on Exhaust Emissions” Visit:http://www.epa.gov/otaq/models/analysis/biodsl/p02001.pdf AVERAGE BIODIESEL EMISSIONS COMPARED TO CONVENTIONAL DIESEL, ACCORDING TO EPA Emission Type B100 B20 Regulated Total Unburned Hydrocarbons -67% -20% Carbon Monoxide -48% -12% Particulate Matter -47% -12% NOx +10% +2% to -2% Non-Regulated Sulfates -100% -20%* PAH (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons)** -80% -13% nPAH (nitrated PAH’s)** -90% -50%*** Ozone potential of speciated HC -50% -10% * Estimated from B100 result **...

Read More

BIODIESEL – A FUEL OF FUTURE

BIODIESEL – A FUEL OF FUTURE

Biodiesel is a safe alternative fuel to replace traditional petroleum diesel. It has high-lubricity, is a clean-burning fuel and can be a fuel component for use in existing, unmodified diesel engines. This means that no retrofits are necessary when using biodiesel fuel in any diesel powered combustion engine. It is the only alternative fuel that offers such convenience. Biodiesel acts like petroleum diesel, but produces less air pollution, comes from renewable sources, is biodegradable and is safer for the environment. Producing biodiesel fuels can help create local economic revitalization and local environmental benefits. Many groups interested in promoting the use of biodiesel already exist at the local, state and national level. Biodiesel is designed for complete compatibility with petroleum diesel and can be blended in any ratio, from additive levels to 100 percent biodiesel. In the United States today, biodiesel is typically produced from soybean or rapeseed oil or can be reprocessed from waste cooking oils or animal fats such as waste fish oil. Because it is made of these easily obtainable plant-based materials, it is a completely renewable fuel source. BENEFITS OF BIODIESEL Biodiesel can be considered a new technology, taking into account all the years consumers have had to settle for traditional diesel. 1. Biodiesel is not harmful to the environment. A vehicle tends to pollute the environment and emits harmful gasses, if injected with HSD whereas if the engine is using biodiesel it emits no harmful gasses rather keeps the environment pollution free. 2. Biodiesel may not require an engine modification. Biodiesel can be blended with diesel so as to improve the efficiency of the engine without any hassles. 3. Biodiesel is cheap. You can even make biodiesel in your backyard. If your engine can work with biodiesel fuel alone, then you really need not go to the gas station to buy fuel. You can just manufacture some for your own personal use. 4. Any Vehicle using Biodiesel has very low idle stating noise. It is noted that biodiesel has a Cetane number of over 100. Cetane number is used to measure the quality of the fuel’s ignition. If your fuel has a high Cetane number, you can be sure that what you get is a very easy cold starting coupled with a low idle noise. 5. Biodiesel is cost effective because it is produced locally. Biodiesel as a fuel not only helps reducing the pollution,...

Read More

HISTORY FOR BIODIESEL

HISTORY FOR BIODIESEL

Developed in the 1890s by inventor Rudolph Diesel, the diesel engine has become the engine of choice for power, reliability, and high fuel economy, worldwide. Early experimenters on vegetable oil fuels included the French government and Dr. Diesel himself, who envisioned that pure vegetable oils could power early diesel engines for agriculture in remote areas of the world, where petroleum was not available at the time. Modern biodiesel fuel, which is made by converting vegetable oils into compounds called fatty acid methyl esters, has its roots in research conducted in the 1930s in Belgium, but today’s biodiesel industry was not established in Europe until the late 1980s. The diesel engine was developed out of a desire to improve upon inefficient, cumbersome and sometimes dangerous steam engines of the late 1800s. The diesel engine works on the principal of compression ignition, in which fuel is injected into the engine’s cylinder after air has been compressed to a high pressure and temperature. As the fuel enters the cylinder it self-ignites and burns rapidly, forcing the piston back down and converting the chemical energy in the fuel into mechanical energy. Dr. Rudolph Diesel, after whom the engine is named, holds the first patent for the compression ignition engine, issued in 1893. Diesel became known worldwide for his innovative engine which could use a variety of fuels. The concept of bio fuel dates back to 1885 when Dr. Rudolf Diesel built the first diesel engine with the full intention of running it on vegetative source. In 1912 he observed, “the use of vegetable oils for engine fuels may seem insignificant today. But such oils may in the course of time become as important as petroleum and the coal tar products of present time.” In 1970, scientists discovered that the viscosity of vegetable oils could be reduced by a simple chemical process and that it could perform as diesel fuel in modern engine. Since then the technical developments have come a long way and the plant oil today has been highly established as bio fuel, equivalent to diesel. Recent environmental (e.g. Kyoto Protocol) and economic concerns have prompted resurgence in the use of biodiesel throughout the world. In 1991, the European Community proposed a 90% tax reduction for the use of bio fuels, including biodiesel. Today 21 countries worldwide produce biodiesel. India is one of the largest petroleum consuming and importing countries. India imports...

Read More